WSBA News Center

PA COVID-19 Update Friday

Harrisburg, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Health today confirmed as of 12:00 a.m., September 17, that there were 933 additional positive cases of COVID-19, bringing the statewide total to 147,923. All 67 counties in Pennsylvania have cases of COVID-19.
Allegheny is reporting an increase of 83 cases, Centre is reporting an increase of 88, Philadelphia is reporting an increase of 83 cases, and York is reporting an increase of 24 cases.
The number of tests administered within the last 7 days between September 10 and September 16 is 176,997 with 5,700 positive cases. There were 24,529 test results reported to the department through 10 p.m., September 16. These results represent the total number of tests administered.
There are 7,913 total deaths attributed to COVID-19, an increase of 10 new deaths reported. County-specific information and a statewide map are available on the COVID-19 Data Dashboard.
“We know that congregation, especially in college and university settings, yields increased case counts. The mitigation efforts in place now are essential to flattening the curve and saving lives,” Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine said. “Wearing a mask, practicing social distancing, and following the requirements set forth in the orders for bars and restaurants, gatherings, and telework will help keep our case counts low. Together, as Pennsylvanians, all of our efforts are designed to support our communities to ensure that cases of COVID-19 remain low.”
Mask-wearing is required in all businesses and whenever leaving home. Consistent mask-wearing is critical to preventing the spread of COVID-19.
Beginning August 29, the department began publishing COVID-19 case counts using the updated standardized case definition for COVID-19 from the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. This revised case definition updates criteria for case identification and case classification based on the continued evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic. It updates probable case classifications and adds suspect case classifications. The definition for confirmed cases using a positive PCR test has not changed. Viral antigen tests, which identify people who are likely currently infected, will now be considered a probable case, even if the individual has no symptoms or exposure history. Persons with a positive antibody (serology) test, moving forward, will no longer be considered a probable case. However, cases previously counted as probable cases, using the prior national case definition, will remain counted as probable cases.
There are 225 cases who have a positive viral antigen test and are considered probable cases and 645 patients who have a positive serology test and either COVID-19 symptoms or a high-risk exposure.
There are 1,721,275 patients who have tested negative to date. Of the patients who have tested positive to date the age breakdown is as follows:
Approximately 1% are ages 0-4;
Nearly 2% are ages 5-12;
Approximately 4% are ages 13-18;
Approximately 12% are ages 19-24;
Approximately 36% are ages 25-49;
Nearly 22% are ages 50-64; and
Approximately 22% are ages 65 or older.
Most of the patients hospitalized are ages 65 or older, and most of the deaths have occurred in patients 65 or older. More data is available here.
The department is seeing significant increases in the number of COVID-19 cases among younger age groups, particularly 19 to 24-year-olds. An alert was sent to healthcare providers about the changing COVID-19 case demographics, as there are more cases in younger age groups than in those 50-64 and 65+. The following regions saw significant increases among 19 to 24-year-olds in each month from April to date in September:
NC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to 71 percent of cases so far in September;
SE – Nearly 5 percent of cases in April to nearly 32 percent of cases so far in September;
NE – 6 percent of cases in April to nearly 39 percent of cases so far in September;
SW – Approximately 5 percent of cases in April to nearly 29 percent of cases so far in September;
NW – Nearly 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 20 percent of cases so far in September; and
SC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 17 percent of cases so far in September.
In nursing and personal care homes, there are 22,095 resident cases of COVID-19, and 4,825 cases among employees, for a total of 26,920 at 957 distinct facilities in 61 counties. Out of our total deaths, 5,327 have occurred in residents from nursing or personal care facilities. A county breakdown can be found here.
Approximately 10,251 of our total cases are among health care workers.
For the latest information for individuals, families, businesses and schools, visit “Responding to COVID-19” on pa.gov.
Currently, all 67 counties are in the green phase of reopening.
Statewide – The Wolf Administration has since noon, Sept. 16:
Renewed call to legislature to legalize adult-use cannabis to help with COVID economic recovery.
Provided Pennsylvania State Police enforcement data.
The Wolf Administration stresses the role Pennsylvanians play in helping to reduce the spread of COVID-19:
Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
Cover any coughs or sneezes with your elbow, not your hands.
Clean surfaces frequently.
Stay home to avoid spreading COVID-19, especially if you are unwell.
If you must go out, you are required to wear a mask when in a business or where it is difficult to maintain proper social distancing.
Updated Coronavirus Links: Press Releases, State Lab Photos, Graphics
Daily COVID-19 Report
Press releases regarding coronavirus
Latest information on the coronavirus
Photos of the state’s lab in Exton (for download and use)
Coronavirus and preparedness graphics (located at the bottom of the page)
Community preparedness and procedures materials
Map with the number of COVID-19 cases
All Pennsylvania residents are encouraged to sign up for AlertPA, a text notification system for health, weather, and other important alerts like COVID-19 updates from commonwealth agencies. Residents can sign up online at www.ready.pa.gov/BeInformed/Signup-For-Alerts.

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PA Issues Call For Poll Workers

Pennsylvania is among many other states who face a shortage of poll workers for the upcoming election.  State Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar says to help fill this need, for the first time, her Department’s Bureau of Professional and Occupational Affairs is encouraging its licensing boards to motivate licensed professionals to volunteer to serve as poll workers.  To date, nursing home administrators, physical therapists, social workers, marriage and family therapists, professional counselors, and speech language pathologists and audiologists are eligible for up to two hours of continuing education credits for serving as poll workers on November 3, on top of a modest pay check.  Anyone interested in becoming a poll worker, can find more information and fill out an interest form on votesPA.com/GetInvolved.

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Man Wounded In Unintentional York City Shooting

A bullet fired in York City ended up going through the front door of a home an unintentionally wounded a 71-year-old man.  Police say it happened along the first block North Franklin Street just before 8:30p Tuesday.  Officers say the victim does not appear to have been targeted.  They say he is being treated at York Hospital.  We do not know his condition.  Anyone who can help the investigation can call the Anonymous Tip Line at 717-849-2204.

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Big Ten Reverses No-Play Decision, PSU Football Returns In October

Almost 6-weeks after the Big Ten, including Penn State decided against playing football, the conference has now voted unanimously to reinstate the season.  The conference’s Council of Chancellors and Presidents say one reason is their plan for the schools to use rapid daily antigen tests for COVID-19 on athletes.  The plan is to begin an 8-game season starting the weekend of Oct. 23-24 and running through mid-December.  The Nittany Lions have not released an updated schedule of those games.

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PA COVID-19 Update Thursday

Harrisburg, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Health today confirmed as of 12:00 a.m., September 16, that there were 776 additional positive cases of COVID-19, bringing the statewide total to 146,990. All 67 counties in Pennsylvania have cases of COVID-19.

The number of tests administered within the last 7 days between September 9 and September 15 is 173,790 with 5,855 positive cases. There were 24,442 test results reported to the department through 10 p.m., September 15. These results represent the total number of tests administered.

There are 7,903 total deaths attributed to COVID-19, an increase of 28 new deaths reported. County-specific information and a statewide map are available on the COVID-19 Data Dashboard.

“We know that congregation, especially in college and university settings, yields increased case counts. The mitigation efforts in place now are essential to flattening the curve and saving lives,” Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine said. “Wearing a mask, practicing social distancing, and following the requirements set forth in the orders for bars and restaurants, gatherings, and telework will help keep our case counts low. Together, as Pennsylvanians, all of our efforts are designed to support our communities to ensure that cases of COVID-19 remain low.”

Mask-wearing is required in all businesses and whenever leaving home. Consistent mask-wearing is critical to preventing the spread of COVID-19.

Beginning August 29, the department began publishing COVID-19 case counts using the updated standardized case definition for COVID-19 from the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. This revised case definition updates criteria for case identification and case classification based on the continued evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic. It updates probable case classifications and adds suspect case classifications. The definition for confirmed cases using a positive PCR test has not changed. Viral antigen tests, which identify people who are likely currently infected, will now be considered a probable case, even if the individual has no symptoms or exposure history. Persons with a positive antibody (serology) test, moving forward, will no longer be considered a probable case. However, cases previously counted as probable cases, using the prior national case definition, will remain counted as probable cases.

There are 205 cases who have a positive viral antigen test and are considered probable cases and 646 patients who have a positive serology test and either COVID-19 symptoms or a high-risk exposure.

There are 1,708,131 patients who have tested negative to date. Of the patients who have tested positive to date the age breakdown is as follows:

  • Approximately 1% are ages 0-4;
  • Nearly 2% are ages 5-12;
  • Approximately 4% are ages 13-18;
  • Approximately 12% are ages 19-24;
  • Approximately 36% are ages 25-49;
  • Nearly 22% are ages 50-64; and
  • Approximately 22% are ages 65 or older.

Most of the patients hospitalized are ages 65 or older, and most of the deaths have occurred in patients 65 or older. More data is available here.

The department is seeing significant increases in the number of COVID-19 cases among younger age groups, particularly 19 to 24-year-olds. An alert was sent to healthcare providers about the changing COVID-19 case demographics, as there are more cases in younger age groups than in those 50-64 and 65+. The following regions saw significant increases among 19 to 24-year-olds in each month from April to date in September:

  • NC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to 71 percent of cases so far in September;
  • SE – Nearly 5 percent of cases in April to nearly 33 percent of cases so far in September;
  • NE – 6 percent of cases in April to approximately 39 percent of cases so far in September;
  • SW – Approximately 5 percent of cases in April to nearly 30 percent of cases so far in September;
  • NW – Nearly 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 20 percent of cases so far in September; and
  • SC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 17 percent of cases so far in September.

In nursing and personal care homes, there are 22,064 resident cases of COVID-19, and 4,806 cases among employees, for a total of 26,870 at 956 distinct facilities in 61 counties. Out of our total deaths, 5,308 have occurred in residents from nursing or personal care facilities. A county breakdown can be found here.

Approximately 10,204 of our total cases are among health care workers.

For the latest information for individuals, families, businesses and schools, visit “Responding to COVID-19” on pa.gov.

Currently, all 67 counties are in the green phase of reopening.

Statewide – The Wolf Administration has since noon, Sept. 15:

The Wolf Administration stresses the role Pennsylvanians play in helping to reduce the spread of COVID-19:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Cover any coughs or sneezes with your elbow, not your hands.
  • Clean surfaces frequently.
  • Stay home to avoid spreading COVID-19, especially if you are unwell.
  • If you must go out, you are required to wear a mask when in a business or where it is difficult to maintain proper social distancing.

Updated Coronavirus Links: Press Releases, State Lab Photos, Graphics

All Pennsylvania residents are encouraged to sign up for AlertPA, a text notification system for health, weather, and other important alerts like COVID-19 updates from commonwealth agencies. Residents can sign up online at www.ready.pa.gov/BeInformed/Signup-For-Alerts.

 

PennDOT has resumed issuing REAL IDs at reopened Driver License Centers offering driver license services throughout the state.  In response to COVID-19 and the national emergency declaration, the federal Department of Homeland Security postponed the enforcement date for REAL ID from October 1, 2020 to October 1, 2021.  For now, REAL ID is optional in Pennsylvania

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Wolf Talks Elections In PA

With less than 50-days before the Nov. 3 election, Governor Tom Wolf is urging immediate legislative action to ensure voters receive their mail-in ballots early and give counties more time to process and count ballots before election day. In a visit to Grace Brethern Church in York, Wolf also reassured Pennsylvanians that in-person voting is safe, and all eligible votes will be counted. After passage of last year’s bipartisan Act-77 which allowed no-excuse mail-in ballots, a record of nearly 1.5-million voters cast a ballot by mail in the primary last spring. An even larger turnout is expect in November. The deadline to register to vote is Monday October-19th. Learn more online at the state web site: votespa.com

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Governor To Appeal Ruling Calling His COVID Restrictions Unconstitutional

“There’s no sense debating a ruling that will be appealed. Two of three federal judges upheld what we did.
“But what’s not up for debate is that our early and decisive action saved lives. While the federal government dithered, Pennsylvania took action. Our hospitals were never overwhelmed and research tells us thousands of lives were saved.
“So would we, in hindsight, do some things differently? Of course.
“Would I follow the irresponsible demands of the President or the Republican legislature? Absolutely not.
“And that’s the choice we all have to make: do we want to be responsible – to our own families and others – and take steps to mitigate the spread of this virus that’s taken 200,000 American lives? Or do we not?
“I believe the vast majority of Pennsylvanians understand what we had to do in the beginning was necessary to keep people safe before we had the resources to reopen safely.
“And the vast majority don’t buy into conspiracy theories or fear mongering from the President or Harrisburg Republicans about this virus. They wear masks. They keep distance. They are smart about how they interact with others. They are responsible.
“And contrary to the misinformation from the legislature, we are reopened. And we’ve been able to manage outbreaks and mitigate risk successfully, while trying to bring some normalcy to our lives. And right now, Pennsylvania is a leader in the region in how we’ve kept deaths and sickness low.
“I will continue to do what is necessary to keep people safe and contain the virus. That’s the key.
“Containing the virus is the only way to protect our health and keep our economy going.
“We will appeal, and we will take that appeal as far as necessary to ensure we can do that.
“I want to reassure people that may be nervous or worried about what’s ahead this fall: no matter what, we will find a way to keep Pennsylvanians safe.
“And I’m going to keep urging the federal government and Republicans in the legislature to take steps to help workers, families and small businesses.
“Yesterday, Harrisburg Republicans “celebrated” while thousands upon thousands in our state continue to suffer and even more worry about what the virus could bring this fall.
“And the President could do nothing but stare at his cell phone and share messages of hate, division and disinformation.
“We need the President and the legislature to get serious about our recovery, and that starts with being responsible about the virus. They are celebrating a court ruling while refusing to help anyone but themselves.
“We deserve better, and I’m going to keep holding their feet to the fire to stop playing politics with this disease and stop fighting me, and start living up to the responsibilities of their offices.
“I’ll continue to keep Pennsylvania’s residents and economy safe by taking the virus seriously and helping those in need.”

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Last Worley & Obetz Defendant Pleads Guilty

The third and final defendant has pleaded guilty to one count of bank fraud following the bankruptcy of a Lancaster County energy company. Prosecutors say former Worley & Obetz controller, 59-year old Judith Avilez of Elizabethtown dmitted she helped the CEO commit a nearly $68-million dollar bank fraud as they attempted to hide losses that led to the company’s collapse in the spring of 2018. Avilez faces up to 30-years in prison, more than $15-million in restitution and a $1-million fine. She will be sentenced in December.

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Arrests Decline In Lancaster City Protests

Two people were arrested on Tuesday after protests in Lancaster city dissipated following a fatal police-involved shooting. That brings the total to just over a dozen people charged with various infractions from vandalism to arson. Bail for the latest suspects was set at $100,000 which is much lower than the $1-million dollar bail set by a Magisterial District Judge for the other defendants. Officials with the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania denounced the amount. Meanwhile, the District Attorney’s investigation into Sunday afternoon’s shooting that along the 300-block of Laurel Street. An officers body cam video appears to show the suspect, 27-year old Ricardo Munoz in an active domestic disturbance call running at the cop while holding a knife. The officer responded by shooting Munoz, killing him.

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PA COVID-19 Update Wednesday

Harrisburg, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Health today confirmed as of 12:00 a.m., September 15, that there were 1,151 additional positive cases of COVID-19, bringing the statewide total to 146,214. All 67 counties in Pennsylvania have cases of COVID-19.
Centre is reporting an increase of 212 cases and Philadelphia is reporting a two-day increase of 197 cases.
The number of tests administered within the last 7 days between September 8 and September 14 is 168,375 with 5,200 positive cases. There were 22,085 test results reported to the department through 10 p.m., September 14. These results represent the total number of tests administered.
There are 7,875 total deaths attributed to COVID-19, an increase of 6 new deaths reported. County-specific information and a statewide map are available on the COVID-19 Data Dashboard.
“We know that congregation, especially in college and university settings, yields increased case counts. The mitigation efforts in place now are essential to flattening the curve and saving lives,” Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine said. “Wearing a mask, practicing social distancing, and following the requirements set forth in the orders for bars and restaurants, gatherings, and telework will help keep our case counts low. Together, as Pennsylvanians, all of our efforts are designed to support our communities to ensure that cases of COVID-19 remain low.”
Mask-wearing is required in all businesses and whenever leaving home. Consistent mask-wearing is critical to preventing the spread of COVID-19.
Beginning August 29, the department began publishing COVID-19 case counts using the updated standardized case definition for COVID-19 from the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. This revised case definition updates criteria for case identification and case classification based on the continued evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic. It updates probable case classifications and adds suspect case classifications. The definition for confirmed cases using a positive PCR test has not changed. Viral antigen tests, which identify people who are likely currently infected, will now be considered a probable case, even if the individual has no symptoms or exposure history. Persons with a positive antibody (serology) test, moving forward, will no longer be considered a probable case. However, cases previously counted as probable cases, using the prior national case definition, will remain counted as probable cases.
There are 169 cases who have a positive viral antigen test and are considered probable cases and 646 patients who have a positive serology test and either COVID-19 symptoms or a high-risk exposure.
There are 1,695,284 patients who have tested negative to date. Of the patients who have tested positive to date the age breakdown is as follows:
Approximately 1% are ages 0-4;
Nearly 2% are ages 5-12;
Approximately 4% are ages 13-18;
Approximately 12% are ages 19-24;
Approximately 36% are ages 25-49;
Nearly 22% are ages 50-64; and
Approximately 22% are ages 65 or older.
Most of the patients hospitalized are ages 65 or older, and most of the deaths have occurred in patients 65 or older. More data is available here.
The department is seeing significant increases in the number of COVID-19 cases among younger age groups, particularly 19 to 24-year-olds. An alert was sent to healthcare providers about the changing COVID-19 case demographics, as there are more cases in younger age groups than in those 50-64 and 65+. The following regions saw significant increases among 19 to 24-year-olds in each month from April to date in September:
NC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 71 percent of cases so far in September;
NE – 6 percent of cases in April to nearly 40 percent of cases so far in September;
SE – Nearly 5 percent of cases in April to nearly 33 percent of cases so far in September;
SW – Approximately 5 percent of cases in April to nearly 30 percent of cases so far in September;
NW – Nearly 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 21 percent of cases so far in September; and
SC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 18 percent of cases so far in September.
In nursing and personal care homes, there are 21,993 resident cases of COVID-19, and 4,787 cases among employees, for a total of 26,780 at 956 distinct facilities in 61 counties. Out of our total deaths, 5,300 have occurred in residents from nursing or personal care facilities. A county breakdown can be found here.
Approximately 10,159 of our total cases are among health care workers.
For the latest information for individuals, families, businesses and schools, visit “Responding to COVID-19” on pa.gov.
Currently, all 67 counties are in the green phase of reopening.
Statewide – The Wolf Administration has since noon, Sept. 14:
Awarded $20 million in relief funding to museums and cultural organizations.
Awarded more than $1.8 million to support agricultural projects.
Provided an update to the COVID early warning monitoring dashboard.
Provided Pennsylvania State Police enforcement data.
The Wolf Administration stresses the role Pennsylvanians play in helping to reduce the spread of COVID-19:
Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
Cover any coughs or sneezes with your elbow, not your hands.
Clean surfaces frequently.
Stay home to avoid spreading COVID-19, especially if you are unwell.
If you must go out, you are required to wear a mask when in a business or where it is difficult to maintain proper social distancing.
Updated Coronavirus Links: Press Releases, State Lab Photos, Graphics
Daily COVID-19 Report
Press releases regarding coronavirus
Latest information on the coronavirus
Photos of the state’s lab in Exton (for download and use)
Coronavirus and preparedness graphics (located at the bottom of the page)
Community preparedness and procedures materials
Map with the number of COVID-19 cases
All Pennsylvania residents are encouraged to sign up for AlertPA, a text notification system for health, weather, and other important alerts like COVID-19 updates from commonwealth agencies. Residents can sign up online at www.ready.pa.gov/BeInformed/Signup-For-Alerts.

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Judge Rules Wolf’s COVID Orders Unconstitutional, Governor To Appeal

The Wolf administration says they will appeal a federal judge’s ruling Monday that the governor’s pandemic restrictions ordered last spring were unconstitutional. Despite a number of courts across the country having rejected similar arguments in other states, U.S. District Judge William Stickman IV, an appointee of President Trump, called Wolf’s orders as overreaching, arbitrary and violated citizens’ constitutional rights. Many of those restrictions calling for residents to stay at home, the commercial shut down, and limits to crowd sizes have since been lifted or eased. Stickman writes that while Governor Wolf had the good intention of addressing a public health emergency, the authority of government is not unfettered, even in an emergency. Wolf press secretary Lyndsay Kensinger says the actions taken by the administration saved, and continue to save lives in the absence of federal action.

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Police Cam Video Of Lancaster City Police Shooting Released

Body cam video appears to show a suspect in an active domestic disturbance call running at a Lancaster City police officer while holding a knife. Officials say the suspect, 27-year old Ricardo Munoz was killed just outside his home along the 300-block of Laurel Street. The officer involved is on administrative leave as the investigation continues. Munoz was out on bail, awaiting trial after he was charged with 4-counts of aggravated assault for an incident in March of last year along the 500-block of North Queen Street that left 4-people stabbed. Munoz’ family told police that the suspect was mentally ill and hadn’t been taking his medications. Meanwhile, 8-people were arrested Sunday night into Monday morning as some protestors broke windows and set small trash fires right after the shooting. Some suspects were charged with vandalism and others were accused of arson. Police used chemical munitions to disperse the rioters. City leaders called for calm and on Monday night demonstrations appeared to be peaceful.

https://lancaster.crimewatchpa.com/lbop/19659/post/officer-involved-shooting-300-blk-laurel-st-body-camera-video-9132020?fbclid=IwAR0UykcxuYH-wwruGG0i8yULdV18dkwh6iaK0yJgNH6qc2vP_xs-CjyG2Dg

 

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PA COVID-19 Update Tuesday

Harrisburg, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Health today confirmed as of 12:00 a.m., September 14, that there were 638 additional positive cases of COVID-19 on September 13 and 620 additional positive cases of COVID-19 on September 14, bringing the statewide total to 145,063. All 67 counties in Pennsylvania have cases of COVID-19.
Philadelphia cases are not included in today’s statewide total because of reporting delays by Philadelphia County. Two-day totals for Philadelphia County will be included in tomorrow’s data release.
The number of tests administered within the last 7 days between September 7 and September 13 is 158,712 with 5,127 positive cases. There were 20,221 test results reported to the department through 10 p.m., September 13. These results represent the total number of tests administered.
There were no new deaths reported Sunday, September 13, and 7 new deaths reported for Monday, September 14 for a total of 7,869 deaths attributed to COVID-19. County-specific information and a statewide map are available on the COVID-19 Data Dashboard.
The statewide percent-positivity went up to 4.2% from 4.0% last week. Counties with concerning percent-positivity include Columbia (13.4%), Indiana (10.7%), Juniata (10.3%), Centre (9.2%), York (7.4%), Fulton (6.7%), Armstrong (6.5%), Chester (6.5%), Butler (6.2%), Franklin (6.2%), Montour (6.2%), Beaver (5.7%), Clarion (5.5%), Mercer (5.4%), Dauphin (5.2%), Greene (5.1%), and Lycoming (5.1%). Each of these counties bears watching as the state continues to monitor all available data.
“We know that congregation, especially over holidays and in college and university settings, yields increased case counts. The mitigation efforts in place now are essential to flattening the curve and saving lives,” Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine said. “Wearing a mask, practicing social distancing, and following the requirements set forth in the orders for bars and restaurants, gatherings, and telework will help keep our case counts low. Together, as Pennsylvanians, all of our efforts are designed to support our communities to ensure that cases of COVID-19 remain low.”
Mask-wearing is required in all businesses and whenever leaving home. Consistent mask-wearing is critical to preventing the spread of COVID-19.
Beginning August 29, the department began publishing COVID-19 case counts using the updated standardized case definition for COVID-19 from the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. This revised case definition updates criteria for case identification and case classification based on the continued evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic. It updates probable case classifications and adds suspect case classifications. The definition for confirmed cases using a positive PCR test has not changed. Viral antigen tests, which identify people who are likely currently infected, will now be considered a probable case, even if the individual has no symptoms or exposure history. Persons with a positive antibody (serology) test, moving forward, will no longer be considered a probable case. However, cases previously counted as probable cases, using the prior national case definition, will remain counted as probable cases.
There are 144 cases who have a positive viral antigen test and are considered probable cases and 646 patients who have a positive serology test and either COVID-19 symptoms or a high-risk exposure.
There are 1,684,609 patients who have tested negative to date. Of the patients who have tested positive to date the age breakdown is as follows:
Approximately 1% are ages 0-4;
Nearly 2% are ages 5-12;
Approximately 4% are ages 13-18;
Nearly 12% are ages 19-24;
Nearly 37% are ages 25-49;
Approximately 22% are ages 50-64; and
Approximately 22% are ages 65 or older.
Most of the patients hospitalized are ages 65 or older, and most of the deaths have occurred in patients 65 or older. More data is available here.
The department is seeing significant increases in the number of COVID-19 cases among younger age groups, particularly 19 to 24-year-olds. An alert was sent to healthcare providers about the changing COVID-19 case demographics, as there are more cases in younger age groups than in those 50-64 and 65+. The following regions saw significant increases among 19 to 24-year-olds in each month from April to date in September:
NC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 69 percent of cases so far in September;
NE – 6 percent of cases in April to 40 percent of cases so far in September;
SE – Nearly 5 percent of cases in April to nearly 33 percent of cases so far in September;
SW – Approximately 5 percent of cases in April to nearly 30 percent of cases so far in September;
NW – Nearly 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 20 percent of cases so far in September; and
SC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 18 percent of cases so far in September.
In nursing and personal care homes, there are 21,934 resident cases of COVID-19, and 4,770 cases among employees, for a total of 26,704 at 953 distinct facilities in 61 counties. Out of our total deaths, 5,297 have occurred in residents from nursing or personal care facilities. A county breakdown can be found here.
Approximately 10,117 of our total cases are among health care workers.
For the latest information for individuals, families, businesses and schools, visit “Responding to COVID-19” on pa.gov.
Currently, all 67 counties are in the green phase of reopening.
Statewide – The Wolf Administration has since noon, Sept. 13:
Provided Pennsylvania State Police enforcement data.
The Wolf Administration stresses the role Pennsylvanians play in helping to reduce the spread of COVID-19:
Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
Cover any coughs or sneezes with your elbow, not your hands.
Clean surfaces frequently.
Stay home to avoid spreading COVID-19, especially if you are unwell.
If you must go out, you are required to wear a mask when in a business or where it is difficult to maintain proper social distancing.
Updated Coronavirus Links: Press Releases, State Lab Photos, Graphics
Daily COVID-19 Report
Press releases regarding coronavirus
Latest information on the coronavirus
Photos of the state’s lab in Exton (for download and use)
Coronavirus and preparedness graphics (located at the bottom of the page)
Community preparedness and procedures materials
Map with the number of COVID-19 cases
All Pennsylvania residents are encouraged to sign up for AlertPA, a text notification system for health, weather, and other important alerts like COVID-19 updates from commonwealth agencies. Residents can sign up online at www.ready.pa.gov/BeInformed/Signup-For-Alerts.

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Rape Suspect Arrested In York

A suspect is being held without bail in York County after he is charged with rape and other sexual assault offenses. The York Daily Record reports that 23-year old D’Angelo Manns is accused of a rape in York City on July-11th and one in West York Borough last week.

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PA COVID-19 Update

The Pennsylvania Department of Health’s daily updates during the pandemic will continue with the exception of Sundays. That data will be included in Monday’s update starting today. On Saturday, health officials confirmed an additional 920-positive cases of COVID-19, bringing the statewide total to 143,805. It was noted that 129-of those cases were detected in York County. The statewide death toll climbed by 25-to-7,862 since the pandemic began last winter.

The number of tests administered within the last 7 days between September 5 and September 11 is 155,174 with 5,223 positive cases. There were 28,365 test results reported to the department through 10 p.m., September 11, the most test results reported in one day to date. These results represent the total number of tests administered.
“We know that congregation, especially over holidays and in college and university settings, yields increased case counts. The mitigation efforts in place now are essential to flattening the curve and saving lives,” Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine said. “Wearing a mask, practicing social distancing, and following the requirements set forth in the orders for bars and restaurants, gatherings, and telework will help keep our case counts low. Together, as Pennsylvanians, all of our efforts are designed to support our communities to ensure that cases of COVID-19 remain low.”

Mask-wearing is required in all businesses and whenever leaving home. Consistent mask-wearing is critical to preventing the spread of COVID-19.

Beginning August 29, the department began publishing COVID-19 case counts using the updated standardized case definition for COVID-19 from the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. This revised case definition updates criteria for case identification and case classification based on the continued evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic. It updates probable case classifications and adds suspect case classifications. The definition for confirmed cases using a positive PCR test has not changed. Viral antigen tests, which identify people who are likely currently infected, will now be considered a probable case, even if the individual has no symptoms or exposure history. Persons with a positive antibody (serology) test, moving forward, will no longer be considered a probable case. However, cases previously counted as probable cases, using the prior national case definition, will remain counted as probable cases.

There are 134 cases who have a positive viral antigen test and are considered probable cases and 646 patients who have a positive serology test and either COVID-19 symptoms or a high-risk exposure.

There are 1,664,000 patients who have tested negative to date. Of the patients who have tested positive to date the age breakdown is as follows:
Approximately 1% are ages 0-4;
Nearly 2% are ages 5-12;
Approximately 4% are ages 13-18;
Nearly 12% are ages 19-24;
Nearly 37% are ages 25-49;
Nearly 22% are ages 50-64; and
Approximately 22% are ages 65 or older.
Most of the patients hospitalized are ages 65 or older, and most of the deaths have occurred in patients 65 or older. More data is available here.

The department is seeing significant increases in the number of COVID-19 cases among younger age groups, particularly 19 to 24-year-olds. An alert was sent to healthcare providers about the changing COVID-19 case demographics, as there are more cases in younger age groups than in those 50-64 and 65+. The following regions saw significant increases among 19 to 24-year-olds in each month from April to date in September:
NC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 69 percent of cases so far in September;

NE – 6 percent of cases in April to nearly 41 percent of cases so far in September;
SE – Nearly 5 percent of cases in April to approximately 33 percent of cases so far in September;
SW – Approximately 5 percent of cases in April to approximately 29 percent of cases so far in September;
NW – Nearly 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 20 percent of cases so far in September; and
SC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 18 percent of cases so far in September.
In nursing and personal care homes, there are 21,844 resident cases of COVID-19, and 4,742 cases among employees, for a total of 26,586 at 951 distinct facilities in 61 counties. Out of our total deaths, 5,293 have occurred in residents from nursing or personal care facilities. A county breakdown can be found here.

Approximately 10,056 of our total cases are among health care workers.
For the latest information for individuals, families, businesses and schools, visit “Responding to COVID-19” on pa.gov.
Currently, all 67 counties are in the green phase of reopening.
The Wolf Administration stresses the role Pennsylvanians play in helping to reduce the spread of COVID-19:
Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
Cover any coughs or sneezes with your elbow, not your hands.
Clean surfaces frequently.
Stay home to avoid spreading COVID-19, especially if you are unwell.
If you must go out, you are required to wear a mask when in a business or where it is difficult to maintain proper social distancing.
Updated Coronavirus Links: Press Releases, State Lab Photos, Graphics
Daily COVID-19 Report
Press releases regarding coronavirus
Latest information on the coronavirus
Photos of the state’s lab in Exton (for download and use)
Coronavirus and preparedness graphics (located at the bottom of the page)
Community preparedness and procedures materials
Map with the number of COVID-19 cases
All Pennsylvania residents are encouraged to sign up for AlertPA, a text notification system for health, weather, and other important alerts like COVID-19 updates from commonwealth agencies. Residents can sign up online at www.ready.pa.gov/BeInformed/Signup-For-Alerts.

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Man Wounded In York City Shooting

A shooting in York City Saturday night left a 25-year old man wounded. Police say it happened just after 11:30 p.m. on Saturday at Saint Paul and Park Place. Officers say the victim was dropped off at a local hospital with a non-life-threatening gunshot wound. Residents who can help the investigation can text a tip to ‘Yorktips’ at 847-411.

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Unrest In Lancaster City After Fatal Police Shooting

A fatal police shooting in Lancaster City Sunday afternoon has led to multiple overnight protests which included broken windows and the setting of some small fires. No word yet on any injuries. The unrest began shortly after 27-year old Ricardo Munoz was shot during an in-progress domestic disturbance along the 300-block of Laurel Street at around 4:15p Sunday afternoon. The Lancaster County District Attorney’s Office says body cam footage allegedly shows Munoz raising a knife in a threatening manner when the officer fired his weapon. That office has been placed on administrative leave. In a Twitter post, Mayor Danene Sorace says “This has been a heartbreaking day for our city. I grieve for the loss of life and know that there are more questions to be answered as the investigation continues.”

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Wolf Visits York Talking About Supporting Businesses During COVID-19

Governor Tom Wolf was in York Thursday calling on the General Assembly to provide more funding to support businesses during the pandemic. During a stop at Buchart Horn, Wolf proposed an additional $225-million in federal CARES Act funding in the form of forgivable loans and grants to small businesses in Pennsylvania through the COVID-19 Relief Statewide Small Business Assistance Program. The governor also wants $100-million in forgivable loans and grants for the hospitality, leisure and service industries, including restaurants and bars, salons, and barber shops.

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PA Warns Of Spotted Lantern Fly

Pennsylvanians are urged to act now against the Spotted Lanternfly for the sake of food security. State Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding says “If you see a Spotted Lanternfly, squash it. Report it.” Redding says the Spotted Lanternfly is native to Asia and was first found in Pennsylvania in 2014. The insect is capable of decimating entire grape vineyards and damaging fruit orchards, hops, walnuts, hardwoods and decorative trees. Those industries contribute billions annually to Pennsylvania’s economy. Redding says Penn State is working with federal and state Departments of Agriculture to develop biological, chemical and physical controls, and other methods to manage the pest. Residents can learn more and report insect activity online at agriculture.pa.gov

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Captured: Red Lion Man Wanted For Baltimore Traffic Accident That Injured Three

A York County man wanted for allegedly striking two bicyclists and a pedestrian with his pickup truck last month in Baltimore has been captured. The York Daily Record reports that the U.S. Marshals Fugitive Task Force and Pennsylvania State Police arrested 32-year-old Brian Adams of Red Lion Wednesday. Officials say Adams was identified as a suspect after police viewed video footage of the incident and interviewing witnesses. Officers say Adams was driving a red Ford F-150 pickup truck along the 1700-block of Eastern Avenue when he hit the group and then drove off. Police say victims were treated at local hospitals with serious but non-life threatening injuries.

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